Thursday, March 14, 2013

AWEA Wind Energy Update -- March 2013

Press release from the American Wind Energy Association...

WASHINGTON, D.C., March 13, 2013 – The American wind industry experienced record-breaking growth in 2012 as a U.S. power provider. American wind power's generation increased 17 percent last year, and produced more than 10 percent of the electricity in nine states, up from five states in 2011. Those numbers are likely to continue growing as new investments and wind projects are announced. Across the country, wind energy produced 3.5 percent of the nation's electricity during 2012, according to the Energy Information Admiration's (EIA) latest figures.

The growth in wind energy in the U.S. can also be seen in its increasing role in the generation mix of individual states. Iowa and South Dakota reached generation levels greater than 20 percent throughout the entire year of 2012. In a total of 14 states, American wind energy provides 5 percent or more of generation.

Iowa was ranked first in wind generation, with 24.5% generation from wind energy. South Dakota was a close second with 23.9% generation from wind energy. North Dakota ranked third with 14.7%. Minnesota closely followed, ranking fourth with over 14% wind energy generation. Kansas, which doubled its installation of wind power during 2012, jumped ahead to No. 5 position in wind generation, surpassing the 10% mark, reaching 11.4% generation from wind energy.


Percent of electric power from wind generation by state
Top 20 States during 2012
Rank
State
% Wind Generation in 2012
Rank
State
% Wind Generation in 2012
1
Iowa
24.5%
11
Texas
7.4%
2
South Dakota
23.9%
12
New Mexico
6.1%
3
North Dakota
14.7%
13
Maine
5.9%
4
Minnesota
14.3%
14
Washington
5.8%
5
Kansas
11.4%
15
California
4.9%
6
Colorado
11.3%
16
Montana
4.5%
7
Idaho
11.3%
17
Illinois
3.9%
8
Oklahoma
10.5%
18
Nebraska
3.7%
9
Oregon
10.0%
19
Hawaii
3.6%
10
Wyoming
8.8%
20
Indiana
2.8%


The geographic diversity and abundance of American wind installations is a reflection of the United States' strong wind resource. In a 2010 study, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory reported over 10 million MW of wind resource in the U.S., enough to power the equivalent of the nation's total electricity needs 10 times over. In fact, 25 states have enough wind potential to supply as much electricity as is currently generated from all energy sources in their state.

Texas, the state that uses the most electricity, relied on wind energy for 9.2% of the electrical generation last year on the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) power grid. The Lone Star State boasts more wind power than any other state, with more than 12,000 MW installed – over a fifth of the 60,000 MW in the United States at the end of last year.

Overall, the U.S. wind energy industry had its strongest year ever in 2012, installing a record 13,124 megawatts (MW) of electric generating capacity, leveraging $25 billion in private investment, and achieving over 60,000 MW of cumulative wind capacity.

In this historic year of achievement, wind energy for the first time became the number one source of new U.S. electric generating capacity, providing some 42 percent of all new generating capacity. Renewable energy as a whole accounted for over 55 percent of all new U.S. generating capacity in 2012.

Note: The statistics count megawatt-hours generated in a state as going to that state. For a state like California, which may be importing wind, these totals are lower than the total renewable energy used to comply with the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.

1 comment:

denise ann lee said...

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